A Vegan Pep Talk (for those thinking it over)

I’ve loved cooking since my discovery of a Bon Appetit magazine when I was 22 years old.  I had just moved into my apartment in Los Angeles and found it in one of my kitchen cupboards.  I was amazed by the foods that I had never heard of, tried a few of the recipes, and was hooked.  I subscribed for a number of years after that moment and still have a healthy stockpile that I refer to regularly.

Going vegan was never intimidating to me.  I was actually excited to re-learn cooking.  I felt like I did when I was 22 and just figuring out new ingredients, experimenting and rewriting recipes, my notes all over the margins.

I started out with the most basic of vegan staples:  pastas, rice, vegetables, beans.  Great websites and cookbooks led me through the ropes and educated me about the crazy things that used to bewilder me.

Now, 10 months later, I’m diving in and experimenting with all those crazy things and loving it.

In the beginning of our vegan adventure, there was a bit of an attempt to try to substitute things for the meat centerpieces of meals. We bought some of those fake chick’n nuggets, for example, but quickly moved away from that effort once we recognized that we didn’t have to abide by the meat-eater’s paradigm.  The past did not have to be a template for our future meals.

Now, we’re happy with our centerpiece being a delicious grilled polenta or a fabulous, creamy barley risotto.  But that’s not to say that some of our old favorites can’t be even more interesting and terrific as vegan dishes.  From pizza and pierogies to chinese stir-fry and sandwiches loaded with sloppy delicious stuff, we miss nothing.

And a happy side effect is that my cholesterol is completely excellent without the use of any meds.  No Zocor, Lipitor, Crestor.   Heart health and happy meals can exist together.  We want for nothing, miss nothing, crave nothing that we can’t have.

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2 responses to this post.

  1. This is motivating and basically, enlightening. You do not have to mimic or mirror the meat-eater’s recipe. Why was there a need to be like that which we seek to move from? Go figure…

    Although not detailed and long, this post really helped.

    Thanks!

    Stephania

    Reply

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